New York Epidemic, 1702

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The year 1702 saw the deaths of both Daniel's wife, Anne Testart, and their son, Isaac - the year of the great Yellow Fever epidemic in New York that killed more than 500 people. The three-month epidemic kills almost 10% of the population of New York. Therefore one may conclude that both fell victim to this epidemic.

Yellow fever is caused by a virus spread from person to person by the urban-dwelling Aedes aegyti mosquito. From the descriptions of the course of the disease in the 1790s, we know that it often began with a sharp headache and a rapid decline to prostration, with, for some, the skin turning yellow, and, for about ten percent of the victims, death, always, it was often said, accompanied by black vomit.
Source

  • General Assembly Venue Altered

  • (A Proclamation that the venue of the upcoming General Assembly would be changed from New York City to the Town of Jamaica in Queens County on the Island of Nassaw, because of the epidemic.)
  • Burying the Dead

  • (A Proclamation instituting a penalty of five pounds to anyone who does not bury their dead after 12 hours.)
  • Ban on Burning Oysters
    (A Proclamation instituting a penalty of five pounds for burning oysters and shells within the city of New York.)
  • Supreme Court Venue Altered
    (A Proclamation that the venue of the upcoming sitting of the Supreme Court would be changed from City Hall at New York City to the Court House at Jamaica in Queens County because of the epidemic.)
  • Prayer & Fasting on Wednesdays
    (A Proclamation instituting every Wednesday henceforth as a day of prayer and fasting in light of the epidemic calamity.)